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Scholarly Interest Report
         
Rosemary Hennessy
Professor
Lawrence H. Favrot Professor of Humanities and Professor of English
 
e-mail:Rosemary.Hennessy@rice.edu
 
  • Ph.D. English (1990) Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • B.A. English (1972) University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
  • M.A. English (1976) Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa
 
Primary Department
   Department of English
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Department Affiliations
 
  • Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
  •  
    Websites
     CSWGS
     
    Research Areas
     Culture Theory Feminist Theory Sexuality and Gender Studies US-Mexico Borderlands Literature of the Americas Social Modernism
     

    Radical Writers of the 1930s

     

    This new research project follows on the concerns of my previous book which deals with the cultures of affect and intimacy knotted into labor organizing on the northern Mexican border. Here I turn to writers of the 1930s, many of them women, who wrote about the culture of labor struggles across genres [fiction, reportage] national, and cultural borders.  I focus on their relation to the Left, in particular the Communist party, as they pressed for attention to a broader understanding of social reproduction, a topic and a concept that has re-surfaced for feminists in the new millennium.

     

    Rosemary Hennessy Research Profile

     

    My scholarship focuses on several related topics: feminist theory, sexuality studies; theories of affect and affect culture; the transnational cultural formations of the Americas in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries; and most recently the social modernism of the US cultural front 1930-50.


    Since 1996 when I received tenure at the University at Albany, I have pursued five major research projects: compiling the historical and theoretical archive of materialist and Marxist feminism; elaborating a materialist feminist analysis of sexuality and sexual identity; researching the cultural features of labor organizing in the northern Mexican border area; collecting the narrative testimonies of factory workers, campesinos and indigenous farmers regarding the impact of a decade of NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) on their lives and communities.


    After completing my book Profit and Pleasure: Sexual Identities in Later Capitalism in 2000, my work took a new turn as I pursued my interest in contemporary US culture on the American southwest and the global forces that have shaped the US-Mexican border in particular.


    An NEH grant took me to a Southwestern Studies Institute at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas and a Rockefeller Humanities grant took me to the University of Arizona, Tucson where I began to develop a book project on the affective components of grassroots organizing in the Mexican communities where maquiladoras (factories for assembly for export) are concentrated. I made the commitment to learn Spanish, launched a new course on the Literature of the Southwest, and began work on Fires on the Border: The Passionate Politics of Labor Organizing on the Mexican Frontera. Picking up on the argument I made in the last chapter of Profit and Pleasure, this book attends to the ways affective relations extend through and beyond identity categories. Even though gender, sexuality, and agency have preoccupied culture theory for decades, there is very little research that brings these issues to the changing realities of the maquiladoras on Mexico's northern border and almost none that takes into account how they feature in the work of organizing and in organizers' explanations of the struggles they are engaged in. As an experiment in oral history and cultural analysis, Fires on the Border maps some of the flash points in the struggle between democracy and capital, desire and need that have eluded the official story and the critical work of cultural studies. Affective relations are the ideological cement of culture, both a necessary component to building trust within and between groups and a battleground where collective efforts founder. How to evaluate the ways they are entangled in all that is told and translated and their bearing on new formations of agency in the transnational class relations of this border area of the American southwest are some of the questions the book takes on.


    Another book project, NAFTA from Below: Maquiladora Workers, Campesinos, and Indigenous Farmers Speak Out on the Impact of Free Trade in Mexico (with Martha Ojeda 2007) [200 pp], interrupted my work on Fires on the Border, prompted by my growing sense of the importance of giving the word to those Mexican farmers and workers who have been most profoundly impacted by free trade. This is a collaborative bilingual project that documents the impact of more than a decade of free trade on maquiladora and other grassroots communities from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers themselves. While NAFTA was approved with promises of jobs and better wages for US and Mexican workers, the reality has been quite different and devastating. The workers, campesinos, and indigenous farmers whose voices are the core of the book survey the impact of free trade on the division of labor, on workers’ rights, health and safety, and speak to the alternatives for cooperative, sustainable living they are building from the grassroots. There is no other book in English or Spanish geared to a broad public readership that documents the history of NAFTA's impact from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers. El TLCAN desde los de Abajo: Trabajadores y Trabajadoras de las Maquilas, Campesinos y Comunidades Indigenas Revelan los Impactos del Libre Comercio en Mexico (with Martha Ojeda) [207 pp] is the Spanish version of NAFTA From Below. The editing for this book has not been completed.


    In December 2013 Fires on the Border was published by University of Minnesota Press.


    In 2014 I begin research toward a new book-length project that focuses on social modernism in the period of the cultural front in US culture.  One part of that project is an abstract of a paper I have submitted to the American Studies Association Conference in November 2014.


    I continue to write on theoretical topics within the fields of feminist and sexuality studies.  Invited lectures on the topics of social reproduction and rethinking materiality are occasions for me to develop papers on these topics in 2014 and as a part of that work I have committed to submit an essay to be published as part of the Finnish project From Violent Backlash to Reparative Interventions – Intersectional Approach to Northern Neo-nationalism. Otherwork in progress includes two full length essays that offer broad assessments of the fields of feminist and sexuality studies for critical handbooks.

     
    Rosemary Hennessy Scholarly Research 2006
     My scholarship focuses on the transnational cultural formations of the Americas in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. I have a strong publication record in feminist and sexuality studies, cultural criticism and theory, and ongoing research in the contemporary cultures of the US-Mexican border. Since 1996 when I received tenure at the University at Albany, I have pursued four major research projects: compiling the historical and theoretical archive of materialist and Marxist feminism; elaborating a materialist feminist analysis of sexuality and sexual identity; researching the cultural impact of neo-liberalism on the US-Mexican border area; and collecting the narrative testimonies of factory workers, campesinos and indigenous farmers regarding the impact of a decade of NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) on their lives and communities.

    After completing my book Profit and Pleasure: Sexual Identities in Later Capitalism in 2000, my work took a new turn as I pursued my interest in contemporary US culture on the American southwest and the global forces that have shaped the US-Mexican border in particular. An NEH grant took me to a Southwestern Studies Institute at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas and I began to develop a new book project on the affective components of grassroots organizing in the Mexican communities where maquiladoras (factories for assembly for export) are concentrated. I made the commitment to learn Spanish, launched a new course on the Literature of the Southwest, and began work on my current book in-progress, Fires on the Border: The Passionate Politics of Organizing on the US-Mexican Frontera.

    Picking up on the argument I made in the last chapter of Profit and Pleasure, this project attends to the ways affective relations extend through and beyond identity categories. Even though gender, sexuality, and agency have preoccupied culture theory for decades, there is very little research that brings these issues to the changing realities of the maquiladoras on Mexico’s northern border and almost none that takes into account how they feature in the work of organizing and in organizers’ explanations of the struggles they are engaged in. As an experiment in oral history and cultural analysis, Fires on the Border maps some of the flash points in the struggle between democracy and capital, desire and need that have eluded the official story and the critical work of cultural studies. Affective relations are the ideological cement of culture, both a necessary component to building trust within and between groups and a battleground where collective efforts founder. How to evaluate the ways they are entangled in all that is told and translated and their bearing on new formations of agency in the transnational class relations of this border area of the American southwest are some of the questions my project takes on.

    This is labor-intensive research that has meant some risk-taking for me as a scholar and a writer. I have had to learn a new language and explore new methodologies. Because of my encounters with Spanish, with Mexican culture, the empirical and the ethnographic, my writing has changed shape and adopts new narrative forms. I am also writing this book for a broader public. Due to the new material and the narrative challenges I have set for myself, this is not a book I can write rapidly. At this point several chapters have been drafted, and the second chapter has been published this year as “The Value of a Second Skin” in the collection Intersections in Feminist and Queer Theory: Sexualities, Cultures and Identities, edited by Diane Richardson, Janice Mc Laughlin and Mark Casey (Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave 2006.)

    Another project, NAFTA from Below: Maquiladora Workers, Campesinos, and Indigenous Farmers Speak Out on the Impact of Free Trade in Mexico (with Martha Ojeda, forthcoming, 2007) [200 pp], interrupted my work on Fires on the Border, prompted by my growing sense of the importance of “giving the word” to those Mexican farmers and workers who have been most profoundly impacted by free trade. This is a collaborative bilingual project that documents the impact of more than a decade of free trade on maquiladora and other grassroots communities from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers themselves. While NAFTA was approved with promises of jobs and better wages for US and Mexican workers, the reality has been quite different and devastating. The workers, campesinos, and indigenous farmers whose voices are the core of the book survey the impact of free trade on the division of labor, on workers’ rights, health and safety, and speak to the alternatives for cooperative, sustainable living they are building from the grassroots. There is no other book in English or Spanish geared to a broad public readership that documents the history of NAFTA’s impact from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers. Because most of the profits of books published by academic and corporate presses go to the publishers, this book is being published by a non-profit organization with the costs of printing and distribution supported by several national foundations and scores of donors in order that the monies from the sale of the book can go directly to the grassroots organizations who participated in making it. In compiling this collection we visited over a dozen organizations, recorded the testimonies of more than thirty workers, and transcribed, translated, and edited them. I wrote the Introduction, Chapter Prefaces, and Glossary. As of December 2006 this book is in press.

    El TLCAN desde los de Abajo: Trabajadores y Trabajadoras de las Maquilas, Campesinos y Comunidades Indígenas Revelan los Impactos del Libre Comercio en México (with Martha Ojeda forthcoming, 2007) [207 pp] is the Spanish version of NAFTA From Below. I did a considerable amount of work on this version as well, including transcribing and editing the interviews. As of Winter 2006 this book is in press.

     

    Rosemary Hennessy Scholarly Research 2010

     

    My scholarship focuses on the transnational cultural formations of the Americas in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. I have a strong publication record in feminist and sexuality studies, cultural criticism and theory, and ongoing research in the contemporary cultures of the US-Mexican border. Since 1996 when I received tenure at the University at Albany, I have pursued four major research projects: compiling the historical and theoretical archive of materialist and Marxist feminism; elaborating a materialist feminist analysis of sexuality and sexual identity; researching the cultural impact of neo-liberalism on the US-Mexican border area; and collecting the narrative testimonies of factory workers, campesinos and indigenous farmers regarding the impact of a decade of NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) on their lives and communities. After completing my book Profit and Pleasure: Sexual Identities in Later Capitalism in 2000, my work took a new turn as I pursued my interest in contemporary US culture on the American southwest and the global forces that have shaped the US-Mexican border in particular. An NEH grant took me to a Southwestern Studies Institute at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas and a Rockefeller Humanities grant took me to the University of Arizona where I began to develop a new book project on the affective components of grassroots organizing in the Mexican communities where maquiladoras (factories for assembly for export) are concentrated. I made the commitment to learn Spanish, launched a new course on the Literature of the Southwest, and began work on my current book in-progress, Fires on the Border: The Passionate Politics of Organizing on the US-Mexican Frontera. Picking up on the argument I made in the last chapter of Profit and Pleasure, this project attends to the ways affective relations extend through and beyond identity categories. Even though gender, sexuality, and agency have preoccupied culture theory for decades, there is very little research that brings these issues to the changing realities of the maquiladoras on Mexico's northern border and almost none that takes into account how they feature in the work of organizing and in organizers'explanations of the struggles they are engaged in. As an experiment in oral history and cultural analysis, Fires on the Border maps some of the flash points in the struggle between democracy and capital, desire and need that have eluded the official story and the critical work of cultural studies. Affective relations are the ideological cement of culture, both a necessary component to building trust within and between groups and a battleground where collective efforts founder. How to evaluate the ways they are entangled in all that is told and translated and their bearing on new formations of agency in the transnational class relations of this border area of the American southwest are some of the questions my project takes on. Another project, NAFTA from Below: Maquiladora Workers, Campesinos, and Indigenous Farmers Speak Out on the Impact of Free Trade in Mexico (with Martha Ojeda 2007) [200 pp], interrupted my work on Fires on the Border, prompted by my growing sense of the importance of giving the word to those Mexican farmers and workers who have been most profoundly impacted by free trade. This is a collaborative bilingual project that documents the impact of more than a decade of free trade on maquiladora and other grassroots communities from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers themselves. While NAFTA was approved with promises of jobs and better wages for US and Mexican workers, the reality has been quite different and devastating. The workers, campesinos, and indigenous farmers whose voices are the core of the book survey the impact of free trade on the division of labor, on workers’ rights, health and safety, and speak to the alternatives for cooperative, sustainable living they are building from the grassroots. There is no other book in English or Spanish geared to a broad public readership that documents the history of NAFTA's impact from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers. El TLCAN desde los de Abajo: Trabajadores y Trabajadoras de las Maquilas, Campesinos y Comunidades Indigenas Revelan los Impactos del Libre Comercio en Mexico (with Martha Ojeda) [207 pp] is the Spanish version of NAFTA From Below. The editing for this book is underway.

     
    Rosemary Hennessy Scholarly Research 2006
     My scholarship focuses on the transnational cultural formations of the Americas in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. I have a strong publication record in feminist and sexuality studies, cultural criticism and theory, and ongoing research in the contemporary cultures of the US-Mexican border. Since 1996 when I received tenure at the University at Albany, I have pursued four major research projects: compiling the historical and theoretical archive of materialist and Marxist feminism; elaborating a materialist feminist analysis of sexuality and sexual identity; researching the cultural impact of neo-liberalism on the US-Mexican border area; and collecting the narrative testimonies of factory workers, campesinos and indigenous farmers regarding the impact of a decade of NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) on their lives and communities.

    After completing my book Profit and Pleasure: Sexual Identities in Later Capitalism in 2000, my work took a new turn as I pursued my interest in contemporary US culture on the American southwest and the global forces that have shaped the US-Mexican border in particular. An NEH grant took me to a Southwestern Studies Institute at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas and I began to develop a new book project on the affective components of grassroots organizing in the Mexican communities where maquiladoras (factories for assembly for export) are concentrated. I made the commitment to learn Spanish, launched a new course on the Literature of the Southwest, and began work on my current book in-progress, Fires on the Border: The Passionate Politics of Organizing on the US-Mexican Frontera.

    Picking up on the argument I made in the last chapter of Profit and Pleasure, this project attends to the ways affective relations extend through and beyond identity categories. Even though gender, sexuality, and agency have preoccupied culture theory for decades, there is very little research that brings these issues to the changing realities of the maquiladoras on Mexico’s northern border and almost none that takes into account how they feature in the work of organizing and in organizers’ explanations of the struggles they are engaged in. As an experiment in oral history and cultural analysis, Fires on the Border maps some of the flash points in the struggle between democracy and capital, desire and need that have eluded the official story and the critical work of cultural studies. Affective relations are the ideological cement of culture, both a necessary component to building trust within and between groups and a battleground where collective efforts founder. How to evaluate the ways they are entangled in all that is told and translated and their bearing on new formations of agency in the transnational class relations of this border area of the American southwest are some of the questions my project takes on.

    This is labor-intensive research that has meant some risk-taking for me as a scholar and a writer. I have had to learn a new language and explore new methodologies. Because of my encounters with Spanish, with Mexican culture, the empirical and the ethnographic, my writing has changed shape and adopts new narrative forms. I am also writing this book for a broader public. Due to the new material and the narrative challenges I have set for myself, this is not a book I can write rapidly. At this point several chapters have been drafted, and the second chapter has been published this year as “The Value of a Second Skin” in the collection Intersections in Feminist and Queer Theory: Sexualities, Cultures and Identities, edited by Diane Richardson, Janice Mc Laughlin and Mark Casey (Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave 2006.)

    Another project, NAFTA from Below: Maquiladora Workers, Campesinos, and Indigenous Farmers Speak Out on the Impact of Free Trade in Mexico (with Martha Ojeda, forthcoming, 2007) [200 pp], interrupted my work on Fires on the Border, prompted by my growing sense of the importance of “giving the word” to those Mexican farmers and workers who have been most profoundly impacted by free trade. This is a collaborative bilingual project that documents the impact of more than a decade of free trade on maquiladora and other grassroots communities from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers themselves. While NAFTA was approved with promises of jobs and better wages for US and Mexican workers, the reality has been quite different and devastating. The workers, campesinos, and indigenous farmers whose voices are the core of the book survey the impact of free trade on the division of labor, on workers’ rights, health and safety, and speak to the alternatives for cooperative, sustainable living they are building from the grassroots. There is no other book in English or Spanish geared to a broad public readership that documents the history of NAFTA’s impact from the perspective of Mexican workers and farmers. Because most of the profits of books published by academic and corporate presses go to the publishers, this book is being published by a non-profit organization with the costs of printing and distribution supported by several national foundations and scores of donors in order that the monies from the sale of the book can go directly to the grassroots organizations who participated in making it. In compiling this collection we visited over a dozen organizations, recorded the testimonies of more than thirty workers, and transcribed, translated, and edited them. I wrote the Introduction, Chapter Prefaces, and Glossary. As of December 2006 this book is in press.

    El TLCAN desde los de Abajo: Trabajadores y Trabajadoras de las Maquilas, Campesinos y Comunidades Indígenas Revelan los Impactos del Libre Comercio en México (with Martha Ojeda forthcoming, 2007) [207 pp] is the Spanish version of NAFTA From Below. I did a considerable amount of work on this version as well, including transcribing and editing the interviews. As of Winter 2006 this book is in press.

     

    Rosemary Hennessy Scholarly Research 2011-12

     

    In 2011 I completed the book proposal for Fires on the Border and submitted it to several presses.  In August 2011 I was awarded a contract with University of Minnesota Press.  I am on leave in 2011-12 and my main task is completing the manuscript which is due to the press in October 2012. 


    I will also complete two book chapters that have been solicited for collections and submit them this year.


    In addition, in 2012 I will be presenting my research in five invited lectures and one research seminar.


     


     

     
    Teaching Areas
     Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Literature and Culture
    Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Feminist Theory
     
    Selected Publications
     Articles
     

    “Open Secrets:  Class and the Culture of Organizing on Mexico’s Northern Border.” Feminist Theory.10.3. 2009.Reprinted in Researching Gender. Ed. Christina Hughes.London: Sage. 2012. REPRINT

     
     

    “Gender Adjustments in Forgotten Places: The North-South Encuentros in Mexico.” Works and Days.   Special Issue on Invisible Battlegrounds:  Feminist Resistance   in the   Global Age of War and Imperialism. 57/58 (Volume 29, Nos. 1 & 2) 2010.

     

     
     

    “Open Secrets:  Class and the Culture of Organizing on Mexico’s Northern Border.”  Special Section on Feminist Methodology. Feminist Theory.10.3. 2009.

     
     “Open Secrets: Class and the Culture of Organizing on Mexico’s Northern Border” Special Section on Feminist Methodology. Feminist Theory. Submitted 2008; forthcoming 2009.
     
     Returning to Reproduction Queerly: Sex, Labor, Need. Rethinking Marxism - Special Section on Queer Theory and Marxism. 18.4 (2006).
     
     Books
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. Fires on the Border:  The Passionate Politics of Labor Organizing on the Mexican Frontera. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota. 2013.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. Fires on the Border:The Passionate Politics of Labor Organizing in Northern Mexico.  Minneapolis, MN:  University of Minnesota Press. 2013 (in press).

     

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary Materialist Feminism and the Politics of Discourse.  New York and London:  Routledge, 1993. --2nd edition. Routledge ebook. 2012. REPRINT

     
     El TLCAN desde los de Abajo: Trabajadores y Trabajadoras de las Maquilas, Campesinos y Comunidades Indigenas Revelan los Impactos del Libre Comercio en Mexico. La Coalicion pro Justicia en las Maquiladoras. Forthcoming, 2007
     
     NAFTA From Below: Maquiladora Workers, Campesinos, Indigenous Farmers Speak Out on the Impact of Free Trade in Mexico. Ed. (with Martha Ojeda). The Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras. Forthcoming, 2007.
     
     Book chapters
     

    “Materialism” in Keywords for Radicals: A Late Capitalist Vocabulary of Culture and

    Society, ed. Kelly Fritsch, Clare O’Connor, A.K. Thompson.  Chico, CA: AK Press (2016). 

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary (2015) “Love in the Labyrinth.” In Red Love across the Pacific. Edited by Ruth Barraclough, Heather Bowen-Struyk, and Paula Rabinowitz.  New York: Palgrave-Macmillan: 163-181.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary (2015) “Open Secrets: Class, Affect, and Sexuality across the US-Mexico Border.” In The Material of World History. Edited by David Churchill and Tina Mai Chen.  New York: Routledge: 51-72.

     
     

    Rosemary Hennessy "“Thinking Sex Materially: Marxist, Socialist, and Related Feminist Approaches." Sage Handbook of Feminist Theory (2014) : 318-26.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Bread and Roses in the Common.” In Love: A Question for Feminism in the Twenty-first Century.  Ed.  Ann Ferguson and Anna Jonasdottir. New York: Routledge. 2013.

     

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Für eine politische Wertigkeit des Affekts: Marxistisch-feministische Notizen Affektive” ( “Notes toward the Political Valence of Affect.” In Rahel Jaeggi and Daniel Loick (eds.):  Gesellschaftskritik nach Marx. Philosophie, Ökonomie, Politische Praxis. Berlin: Akademie. 2013

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Bread and Roses in the Commons.” In The Question of Love for Feminism.  Ed.  Ann Ferguson and Anna Jonasdottir. New York: Routledge. In press. 2013.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Love in the Labyrinth.”  In Sex, Texts, Comrades:  Red Love across the Pacific. Ed. Ruth Barraclough, Heather Bowen-Struyk, and Paula Rabinowitz.  New York: Routledg. In press 2013.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Materialist Feminist Approaches to Sexuality.” In Feminist Theory.  Ed. Mary Evans et al. London: Sage. In press. 2013.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Notes toward the Political Valence of Affect.” In Rahel Jaeggi and Daniel Loick (eds.): Gesellschaftskritik nach Marx. Philosophie, Ökonomie, politische Praxis. Berlin:Akademie. In press 2013.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Open Secrets: Class, Affect, and Sexuality across the US-Mexico Border.” In Historical Materialism and World History. Ed.  David Churchill and Tina Chen.  Vancouver: University of British Columbia. Forthcoming 2013.

     
     

    “Queer Material, Historical Urgencies.” In Queer Odyssies. Ed. Kevin S. Amidon

    Thomas O. Haakenson,  David J. Prickett.  Under consideration. University of Minnesota

    Press.

     

    

     
     

    “Open Secrets: Class, Affect, and Sexuality across the US-Mexico Border.” In Historical     Materialism and World History. Ed.  David Churchill and Tina Chen.

     
     The Value of a Second Skin. In Intersections Between Feminist and Queer Theory: Sexualities, Cultures and Identities. Ed. Diane Richardson, Janice Mc Laughlin and Mark E. Casey. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave. 2006. 116-135.
     
     Other
     

    "Feminism." In Briefe Aus der Ferne.  Ed. Frigga Haug. Berlin: Argument Verlag. 2010.

     
     

    Editor.  “Class and Work”.  Stanford Encyclopedia of Feminist Philosophy.  2010-

     
     

    “The Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras” [with Martha Ojeda].  Oxford Encyclopedia of Latina/o Politics, Law, and Social Movements. Ed.  Suzanne Oboler and Deena González. New York: Oxford. 2011. Revised.

     

     
    Presentations
     Conference Paper
     

    “We got to remember to be able to fight”: The Transformative Mapping of Misery in  Meridel Le Sueur. American Studies Association. Toronto, Canada. October, 10 2015.

     

     
     Invited Talks
     

    “What's Sex Got to Do With It?:  Lessons on the Affects of Social Movement from the Northern Mexican Border.” Pride Week Academic Lecture. Rice University. April 2016.

     

     
     

    Keynote Lecture. “The Hidden Material of Social Reproduction: Affect-Culture, Surplus Common.” Materiality Revisited/Rethinking Materiality Conference. University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.  September 10, 2014.

     
     

    “Open Secrets Here and There.”  Women and Gender Studies Program Lecture. College Station, TX, Texas A&M University.  April 2012.

     
     

    Roundtable.  Literature, Gender, Class in Global Times.  Shanghai University.  Shanghai, China. May 2010.

     
     “Open Secrets Here and There: Class, Sexuality (and Affect) by way of the Mexico-US Border." University of Amsterdam. Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis. November 22,
     
     Keynote Speaker
     

    Keynote. “On Feminist Reading Practices and the Specter of Radical Knowledge.”

    Graduate Symposium. Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

     Rice University.  April, 2015.

     
     

    Keynote. “Re-membering Reproduction: Revisiting Radical Women Writers of the 1930s.” Dissenting Traditions Conference. Queens University, Peterborough, Canada. October 23, 2015.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary.“Affect, Need, Surplus Common.”  Plenary Panel.  Historical Materialism Conference.  New York University.  April 26, 2013.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. Keynote Lecture.  "On Value, Affect, Labor." Marxist Reading Group Conference. University of Florida, Gainesville.  February 2012.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. Keynote Lecture.  “Revisioning Class and the Value of a Second Skin.” Graduate Student Conference.  University of Houston.  March 2012.

     
     

    Keynote.  “Bread and Roses in the Commons.” The Question of Love for Feminism/Love in our Time Conference. Orebro, Sweden.  December 2010

     
     

    Keynote. Marxist Feminist Notes toward the Political Valence of Affect. Rethinking Marx Conference. Humboldt University.  Berlin, Germany. May 2011

     
     

    Keynote. Manchester University.  Feminism and Political Economy Workshop. Manchester, UK.  May 2011

     
     

    Keynote. The Question of Love for Feminism/Love in our Time Conference. Orebro, Sweden.  December 2010.

     
     

    Keynote. "Class, Affect, and Sexuality." Historical Materialism and World History Conference.  University of Winnipeg. Canada. March 2009.

     
     

    Keynote. “Autonomy, Community, and the State: North-South Considerations for Gender Futures." Gender Futures Conference. Center for Gender and Law. London, UK.  April 2009.

     
     

    Keynote. “Bioderegulation.”  Reinstating Transgression Seminar.  American University.    Washington,    D.C. April 2010.

     

     
     
     
     “Autonomy, Community, and the State” Gender Futures Conference. Center for Gender and Law. London, UK April, 2009
     
     Lectures
      “NAFTA Migration: Gender, Labor, and Land De-regulation.” Mexico Hoy. University of Houston. April, 2008
     
     Other
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Standpoint.”  Scientia Series on Big Ideas.  Rice University. March 12, 2013.

     
     Panelist
     

    “Going Organic:  Communication in the Arc of the Curriculum.”  Communication in the Disciplines Conference. Rice University.  February 2015.

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. "Snapshots of Attachment along the Northern Mexican Border.”  Modernist Studies Conference.  October 12, 2013.

     

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Love and Loss in the Labyrinth.”  Jornada Internacional de Fronteras/Borderlands Cultura e Historia.  Tecnológia de Monterrey. Monterrey, Mexico.  November 13, 2013

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Gender Adjustments in Mexico’s Grassroots.”  Latin American Studies Congress.  San Francisco.  May, 2012.

     

     
     

    Hennessy, Rosemary. “Love in the Labyrinth: Snapshots of Attachment as a Site of Struggle along the Northern Mexican Border.”  Modernist Studies Conference.  October, 2013.

     

     
     

    "Reading the Cultures of Organizing on Mexico's Northern Border." The Current State of Empire Studies Symposium. University of Houston.  Houston, TX. April 2009.

     
     

    Respondent.  “Making Disappearing Women Appear: Representing Femicide at the Border on Juarez Murders.” American Studies Association. San Antonio, TX. November 2010.

     
     “The Legacy of Socialist Feminism: Lessons from the Global South.” Berkshire Conference of Women Historians. June 2008.
     
     Seminar Speaker
     

    "Fires on the Border" Feminist Research Group.  Rice University.  October, 2012.

     
     Workshops
     

    Seminar leader.  Feminist Theory Workshop.  Duke University. Durham, NC. March 2010.

     
    Editorial Positions
     Member of the Editorial Board, Feminist Theory. Sage. (2015 - 2015)

     Other, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University . (2010 - 2010)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Social Justice Book Series. Routledge. (2015 - 2015)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Feminist Theory. Sage. (1998 - 1998)

     Member of the Editorial Board, SQS. (2015 - 2015)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Cultural Logic (international electronic journal); . (2014 - 2014)

     Member of the Editorial Board, revueperiode.net (French journal). (2014 - 2014)

     Member of the Editorial Board, SQS: Society of Queer Studies Journal, Finland. (2008 - 2014)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Stanford Encyclopedia of Pilosophy. (2013 - 2014)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Feminist Theory. (2004 - 2013)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Routledge Social Justice Series. (2013 - 2014)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Cultural Critique. University of Minnesota. (2010 - 2010)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Social Justice Book Series. Routledge. (2010 - 2010)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Feminist Theory. Sage. (2010 - 2010)

     Member of the Editorial Board, revueperiode. online journal. (2015 - 2015)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Routledge Social Justice Series. Routledge. (2008 - 2008)

     Member of the Editorial Board, SQS: Society of Queer Studies Journal, Finland. SQS Suomen Queer-tutkimuksen Seura. (2006 - 2006)

     Member of the Editorial Board, SQS: Society of Queer Studies Journal, Finland. SQS Suomen Queer-tutkimuksen Seura. (2008 - 2008)

     Member of the Editorial Board, SQS: Society of Queer Studies Journal, Finland. SQS Suomen Queer-tutkimuksen Seura. (2007 - 2007)

    Supervised Theses & Dissertations
     Robin Sager, Ph.D. A Comparative Study of Family Cruelty: 1850-1865.”. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Cecilia Balli, Ph.D. Anthropology The Spatial Politics of the Murders in Juarez. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Kevin Morrison, Ph.D. English Victorian Masculinity. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Robert Wilkie, Ph.D. English Capital Networks: Culture and Class in the Internet Age.. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Cecilia Balli, Ph.D. Spatial Politics of the Murders in Juarez. (2009) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Kevin Morrison, Ph.D. Victorian Masculinity. (2010) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Robin Sager, Ph.D. A Comparative Study of Family Cruelty: 1850-1865.. (2011) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Adriane Bazusko, Ph.D. Reading Twentieth Century US Culture Wars. (2012) (Thesis Director)

     Robin Sager, Ph.D. A Comparative Study of Family Cruelty. (2012) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Kimberly Macellaro, Ph.D. Reification, Race, and Coloniality: Historical Materialist Readings of Early and Mid Twentieth Century Masculinity.. (2012) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberly Macellaro, Ph.D. “Reification, Race, and Coloniality: Historical Materialist Readings of late Nineteenth-Century Masculinity.” . (2013) (Thesis Director)

     Bazusko Adrianne, Ph.D. “Persistent Need: Poverty in Post-War America.” . (2013) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberly Macellaro, Ph.D Reading Reification in Early Twentieth Century US Fiction. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Adriane Bazusko, Ph.D. “Traficking in the Spaces of Poverty: The Post-War Wars of American Literature and Culture.” . (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Joanna Fax, Ph.D. Affects at Work: Labor and Queer Subjectivity from McCarthyism to Neoliberal Times. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberly Macellaro, Ph.D. Reification, Race, and Coloniality. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Adriane Bazusko, Ph.D. Reading Poverty in Late Twentieth Century Literature. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Kendall Post, BA Sexual Violence on College Campuses. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Joanna Fax, Ph.D "Affective Labor in Neoliberal US Literature and Culture.” . (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Meina Yates-Richard, Ph.D. Echoes of Future Past: Sonic Testimony in African American Diasporic Literature, 1845-Present. (2015) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Joanna Fax, Ph.D. “Sexual Deregulation: Reading New Subjects of Affective Labor from the Cold War to the Neoliberal Era,” . (2015) (Thesis Director)

     Kendall Post, B.A. “Title IX and Sexual Violence: An Institutional Ethnography of Rice University.” . (2015) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberly Macellaro, Ph.D. “The Dialectics of Form: Race, Gender, and Reification in Early Twentieth-Century American Literature.” . (2015) (Thesis Director)

     Nessette Falu, Ph.D. Lesbicas Negras' Therapeutic Ethics and Contestation of Brazilian . (2015) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Joanna Fax, Ph.D. “Sexual Deregulation: Reading New Subjects of Affective Labor from the Cold War to the Neoliberal Era,”. (2016) (Thesis Director)

     Meina Yates-Richard, Ph.D. “Echoes of the Future Past: Sonic Testimony in African American and Diasporic Literature, 1845-Present.”. (2016) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Joanna Fax, Ph.D. “Sexual Deregulation: Reading New Subjects of Affective Labor from the Cold War to the Neoliberal Era,”. (2016) (Thesis Director)

     Eliza Williamson, Ph.D. “Maternity and Affect in Brazilian Healthcare,”. (2017) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Magen Eissenstat, B.A. Reading Facebook. (2017) (Thesis Director)

     Lorena Gautherau, Ph.D. . “Class, Race, and the Coloniality of Power in Mexican American Literature,”. (2017) (Thesis Committee Member)

    Positions Held
     Director, Center for the Study of Women, Gender and Sexuality. (2011 - 2011)