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Scholarly Interest Report
         
James R. Pomerantz
Professor
Professor of Psychology and Director of the Neuroscience Program
 
e-mail:pomeran@rice.edu
 
  • Ph.D. (1974) Yale University Psychology (1974) Yale University, New Haven, CT
  • B. A. (1968) University of Michigan Psychology (1968) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • M.A. (1996) Brown University (ad eundem) (1996) Brown University, Providence, RI
 
Primary Department
   Department of Psychology
Picture
 
Department Affiliations
 
  • Master of Liberal Studies
  • Neuroscience Program
  • Scientia
  •  
    Other Affiliations
     
  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • University of Texas Medical School at Houston
  •  
    Websites
     James R. Pomerantz
     James R. Pomerantz personal website
     James R. Pomerantz faculty website
     James R. Pomerantz-Rice
     James R. Pomerantz-Rice
     James R. Pomerantz
     James R. Pomerantz
     Neuroscience at Rice
     Scientia
     James R. Pomerantz
     
    Research Areas
     Cognitive psychology, human perception, cognitive neuroscience; vision science; assessment of student achievement
     

    Research Interests 2013

     

    My current research interests involve the development of the next version of the Theory of Basic Gestalts (Pomerantz, 2001; Pomerantz & Portillo, 2011).  This is a new approach to describing and understanding the Gestalt problem in perception and cognition, whereby when parts or other elements assemble into configurations, those configurations are different from the sum of their parts and are often more perceptually salient, and are perceived more quickly and accurately, than those parts.  TBG attempts to explains these configural effects by means of emergent features that arise when parts configure, such as symmetry, parallelism, colinearity, proximity, orientation, and closure.  TBG maintains that when two or more parts form a perceptual group, that means only that new emergent features have appeared to which the visual system is highly sensitive.  TBG explains a variety of Gesalt phenomena, including configural superiority effects, Garner interference, absence of Stroop interference, successful divided attention, redundancy losses in perception, and false popout.


     


    The new version of TBG in the works, 2.0, expands the scope of the first version by offering a new explanation of standard popout, wherein a unique item pops out from a field of distractor quickly, with a time that is independent of the number of distractors presented in the display. We now have multiple examples where a single, unique item fails to pop out, and where a common item does pop out. TBG2.0 argues that pop out results from symmetry breaking and not from uniqueness. TBG2.0 also does a better job of explaining false pop, including our lab's new demonstration of pure false pop out.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M. C. (2011). Grouping and emergent features in vision: Toward
    a theory of basic Gestalts. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and
    Performance, 37 (5), 1331-1349.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. (2012).  Emergent Features, Gestalts, and Feature Integration Theory. J. Wolfe & L. Robertson (Eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman (pp. 187-192).  New York: Oxford University Press.


    Wagemans, J., Feldman, J., Gepshtein, S., Kimchi, R. Pomerantz, J. R., van der Helm, P. & van Leeuwen (2012). A century of Gestalt psychology in visual perception II: Conceptual and theoretical foundations. Psychological Bulletin, 138 (6), 1218-1252.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Cragin, A. I. (2013).  Emergent Features and Feature Combination.  Chapter to appear in Wagemans, J., Oxford Handbook of Perceptual Organization.  Oxford University Press (refereed; paper publication expected 2014). http://goo.gl/LLXoI


    Historically, my research has focused on 4 different areas: · Perceptual Organization and Gestalt Psychology · Selective Attention and Information Processing · Visual Illusions · Mental Imagery My work on the first two of these areas, Perceptual Organization and Selective Attention, represents my primary research focus, even through today, and these two areas are linked. Most centrally, I have studied the age-old problem of visual grouping: the binding in the visual system of sets of features, attributes, contours and the like into unitary perceptual groups. I have worked to develop objective, theoretically-grounded performance measures for grouping, the absence of which proved a major stumbling block for Gestalt psychology. As a result, previously ambiguous terms such as pattern, configuration, and whole can now be operationally defined. My contribution has been to link grouping with selective attention: two entities belong to the same perceptual group if one cannot attended selectively to one while ignoring the other, and if one can successfully attend to both simultaneously. Based on this insight, I was able to demonstrate how perceptual groups are processed, particularly in the human visual system. My work has also led to a better understanding of emergent features, such as symmetry or closure, which can arise from configurations of perceptual elements such as line segments. Here again my work has focused on constructing theoretical conceptions of what constitutes an emergent feature and from the results devising operational definitions and performance measures, mostly RT (reaction time) for detecting them. My demonstrations have found their way into the major textbooks in the field. The RT effects I uncovered are robust, on the order of 10 times the magnitude of the most commonly researched effects in human perception (and may be the largest RT effects in cognitive psychology, so large, as they say, that no statistics are needed to document them). My most recent work is focused on comparing the two most common measures of selective attention, Stroop Interference and Garner Interference. This work shows that despite the nominal similarity of these two measures, the correlation between them is effectively zero. This in turn has led me to scrutinize the theory behind each effect and to the development of a model showing how the two arise independently.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Garner, W. R. (1973b). Stimulus configuration in selective attention tasks. Perception & Psychophysics, 14, 565-569.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Schwaitzberg, S. D. (1975). Grouping by proximity: Selective attention measures. Perception & Psychophysics, 18, 355-361.


    Pomerantz, J. R., Sager, L. C., & Stoever, R. J. (1977). Perception of wholes and of their component parts: Some configural superiority effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 3, 422-435.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983b). Global and local precedence: Selective attention in form and motion perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 112, 516-540.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Pristach, E. A. (1989). Emergent features, attention and perceptual glue. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 15, 635-649.


    Lew, H., Chmiel, R., Jerger, J., Pomerantz, J. R., & Jerger, S. (1997). Electrophysiologic indices of Stroop and Garner interference reveal linguistic influences on auditory and visual processing. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 8, 104-118.


    My work on illusions includes the first published paper on the Illusory Pausing effect (whereby discs moving on collision courses in the visual field appear to pause when they glide over one another); a complete explanation of the Rubber Pencil Illusion (a robust effect whereby straight line contours appear to bend or go rubbery when the lines are put into motion, as when a pencil is wobbled between finger and thumb); and an explanation of the Grass Is Greener Illusion (which demonstrates rather than being a metaphor, the effect is literally true and is an unavoidable consequence of ecological optics). It also includes work on the Aperture problem in vision (why barber pole stripes appear to move vertically when in fact the pole is rotating horizontally); Motion Aftereffects (when stationary objects appear to move after a viewer has watched a moving display for a prolonged period of time); Apparent Motion (of the type seen in moving pictures, where sequential presentation of static images yields the perception of smooth, continuous motion); and Subjective Contours (the perception of edges where none exist).


    Kolers, P. A., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1971). Figural change in apparent motion. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 87, 99-108.


    Pomerantz, J. R., Goldberg, D. M., Golder, P. S., & Tetewsky, S. (1981). Subjective contours can facilitate performance in a reaction-time task. Perception & Psychophysics, 29, 605-611.


    Goldberg, D. M., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1982). Models of illusory pausing and sticking. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 8, 547-561.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983a). The rubber pencil illusion. Perception & Psychophysics, 33, 365-368.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983c). The grass is always greener: An ecological analysis of an old aphorism. Perception, 12, 501-502.


    Finally, my work in Mental Imagery consists of a paper that has gone on to become a Citation Classic and has been reprinted in various places. It deals with one of the core problems in cognitive science, the issue of the form of mental representation, or in particular how the mind and brain encode visual objects. Although I have not continued research in this area, I retain an active interest in it.


    Kosslyn, S. M., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1977). Imagery, propositions, and the form of internal representation. Cognitive Psychology, 9, 52-76. Also reprinted in N. Block (Ed.), Readings in Philosophy of Psychology, Vol. 2. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1981.

     

    Research Interests 2014

     

    2014 update:


    My ongoing research interests focus on testing the prevailing theory of visual perception and attention today, Anne Treisman's Feature Integration Theory. That theory explains vision in terms of a two-stage process. In the first stage, basic features are extracted by the visual system quickly, automatically, and in parallel; these features include color, depth, orientation, motion, and about a dozen others. In the second stage, features combinations are integrated in a slow, attention demanding, and sequential process. The primary diagnostic tool to identify what features are basic is pop out, a phenomenon in which perceivers can identify the one unique target in a field of identical distractors irrespective of how many distractors there are. Thus a single black sheep pops out from a flock of white; a moving image pops out from a field of stationary.


    Our lab's research challenges this notion by demonstrating several powerful visual phenomena that cannot be explained by Feature Integration Theory. In the last three years, we have focused on cases where integrations of basic feature (e.g., a moving red object - defined by both its color and motion) pop out more quickly than single basic features. We have also discovered and partly explained a new phenomenon we call False Popout. Here, one looks at a display containing all identical items except for one odd one and is instructed to point to that odd one. In one case, subjects repeated point at one of the identical items, which is analogous to pointing to one of the white sheep instead of the lone black sheep. In our most recently discovered effect, observers point neither to the single different item in the display nor to one of the distractors but instead to a point in empty space between them. These effects are quite robust and are shown by almost all people who participate in the experiments. These effect are explained by our Theory of Basic Gestalts, which is described below.


     


     


    2013 statement:


    My current research interests involve the development of the next version of the Theory of Basic Gestalts (Pomerantz, 2001; Pomerantz & Portillo, 2011).  This is a new approach to describing and understanding the Gestalt problem in perception and cognition, whereby when parts or other elements assemble into configurations, those configurations are different from the sum of their parts and are often more perceptually salient, and are perceived more quickly and accurately, than those parts.  TBG attempts to explains these configural effects by means of emergent features that arise when parts configure, such as symmetry, parallelism, colinearity, proximity, orientation, and closure.  TBG maintains that when two or more parts form a perceptual group, that means only that new emergent features have appeared to which the visual system is highly sensitive.  TBG explains a variety of Gesalt phenomena, including configural superiority effects, Garner interference, absence of Stroop interference, successful divided attention, redundancy losses in perception, and false popout.


    The new version of TBG in the works, 2.0, expands the scope of the first version by offering a new explanation of standard popout, wherein a unique item pops out from a field of distractor quickly, with a time that is independent of the number of distractors presented in the display. We now have multiple examples where a single, unique item fails to pop out, and where a common item does pop out. TBG2.0 argues that pop out results from symmetry breaking and not from uniqueness. TBG2.0 also does a better job of explaining false pop, including our lab's new demonstration of pure false pop out.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M. C. (2011). Grouping and emergent features in vision: Toward
    a theory of basic Gestalts. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and
    Performance, 37 (5), 1331-1349.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. (2012).  Emergent Features, Gestalts, and Feature Integration Theory. J. Wolfe & L. Robertson (Eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman (pp. 187-192).  New York: Oxford University Press.


    Wagemans, J., Feldman, J., Gepshtein, S., Kimchi, R. Pomerantz, J. R., van der Helm, P. & van Leeuwen (2012). A century of Gestalt psychology in visual perception II: Conceptual and theoretical foundations. Psychological Bulletin, 138 (6), 1218-1252.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Cragin, A. I. (2013).  Emergent Features and Feature Combination.  Chapter to appear in Wagemans, J., Oxford Handbook of Perceptual Organization.  Oxford University Press (refereed; paper publication expected 2014). http://goo.gl/LLXoI


    Historically, my research has focused on 4 different areas: · Perceptual Organization and Gestalt Psychology · Selective Attention and Information Processing · Visual Illusions · Mental Imagery My work on the first two of these areas, Perceptual Organization and Selective Attention, represents my primary research focus, even through today, and these two areas are linked. Most centrally, I have studied the age-old problem of visual grouping: the binding in the visual system of sets of features, attributes, contours and the like into unitary perceptual groups. I have worked to develop objective, theoretically-grounded performance measures for grouping, the absence of which proved a major stumbling block for Gestalt psychology. As a result, previously ambiguous terms such as pattern, configuration, and whole can now be operationally defined. My contribution has been to link grouping with selective attention: two entities belong to the same perceptual group if one cannot attended selectively to one while ignoring the other, and if one can successfully attend to both simultaneously. Based on this insight, I was able to demonstrate how perceptual groups are processed, particularly in the human visual system. My work has also led to a better understanding of emergent features, such as symmetry or closure, which can arise from configurations of perceptual elements such as line segments. Here again my work has focused on constructing theoretical conceptions of what constitutes an emergent feature and from the results devising operational definitions and performance measures, mostly RT (reaction time) for detecting them. My demonstrations have found their way into the major textbooks in the field. The RT effects I uncovered are robust, on the order of 10 times the magnitude of the most commonly researched effects in human perception (and may be the largest RT effects in cognitive psychology, so large, as they say, that no statistics are needed to document them). My most recent work is focused on comparing the two most common measures of selective attention, Stroop Interference and Garner Interference. This work shows that despite the nominal similarity of these two measures, the correlation between them is effectively zero. This in turn has led me to scrutinize the theory behind each effect and to the development of a model showing how the two arise independently.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Garner, W. R. (1973b). Stimulus configuration in selective attention tasks. Perception & Psychophysics, 14, 565-569.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Schwaitzberg, S. D. (1975). Grouping by proximity: Selective attention measures. Perception & Psychophysics, 18, 355-361.


    Pomerantz, J. R., Sager, L. C., & Stoever, R. J. (1977). Perception of wholes and of their component parts: Some configural superiority effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 3, 422-435.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983b). Global and local precedence: Selective attention in form and motion perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 112, 516-540.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Pristach, E. A. (1989). Emergent features, attention and perceptual glue. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 15, 635-649.


    Lew, H., Chmiel, R., Jerger, J., Pomerantz, J. R., & Jerger, S. (1997). Electrophysiologic indices of Stroop and Garner interference reveal linguistic influences on auditory and visual processing. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 8, 104-118.


    My work on illusions includes the first published paper on the Illusory Pausing effect (whereby discs moving on collision courses in the visual field appear to pause when they glide over one another); a complete explanation of the Rubber Pencil Illusion (a robust effect whereby straight line contours appear to bend or go rubbery when the lines are put into motion, as when a pencil is wobbled between finger and thumb); and an explanation of the Grass Is Greener Illusion (which demonstrates rather than being a metaphor, the effect is literally true and is an unavoidable consequence of ecological optics). It also includes work on the Aperture problem in vision (why barber pole stripes appear to move vertically when in fact the pole is rotating horizontally); Motion Aftereffects (when stationary objects appear to move after a viewer has watched a moving display for a prolonged period of time); Apparent Motion (of the type seen in moving pictures, where sequential presentation of static images yields the perception of smooth, continuous motion); and Subjective Contours (the perception of edges where none exist).


    Kolers, P. A., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1971). Figural change in apparent motion. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 87, 99-108.


    Pomerantz, J. R., Goldberg, D. M., Golder, P. S., & Tetewsky, S. (1981). Subjective contours can facilitate performance in a reaction-time task. Perception & Psychophysics, 29, 605-611.


    Goldberg, D. M., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1982). Models of illusory pausing and sticking. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 8, 547-561.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983a). The rubber pencil illusion. Perception & Psychophysics, 33, 365-368.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983c). The grass is always greener: An ecological analysis of an old aphorism. Perception, 12, 501-502.


    Finally, my work in Mental Imagery consists of a paper that has gone on to become a Citation Classic and has been reprinted in various places. It deals with one of the core problems in cognitive science, the issue of the form of mental representation, or in particular how the mind and brain encode visual objects. Although I have not continued research in this area, I retain an active interest in it.


    Kosslyn, S. M., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1977). Imagery, propositions, and the form of internal representation. Cognitive Psychology, 9, 52-76. Also reprinted in N. Block (Ed.), Readings in Philosophy of Psychology, Vol. 2. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1981.

     

    Research Interests, 2016 Update

     

    2016 Update: Much of my research now is focused on two particular problems: anti-metamers, and the detection of emergent features. Metamers are physically different stimuli that are perceptually identical. An example would be a monochromatic (single wavelength) of light at 570 nanometers, and a blend of two wavelengths of light, namely 540nm and 600nm. Both will look yellow, and we cannot tell the difference between the two patches of light despite their having nothing in common physically. We have been studing shape metamers - two shapes that are different but that look identical. We have also been studying the reverse, what we have called "anti-metamers". These are pairs of stimuli that are physically identical but that look different. In 2014, we took the bronze medal (3rd place) in the international Best Illusion of the Year Contest, which is partly sponsored by Scientific American, which in turn publishes the results. In other research, we look at the detection of emergent features, which are defined as features of stimulus combinations (wholes) that are not possessed by any of their components (parts). The configural superiority effect occurs when human perceivers can tell wholes apart better than they can distingish the parts that make them different. More specifically, we have recently shown that people are better able to tell whether two line segments are parallel or not better than they can tell the slope of either of the lines. Finally, in 2016 we concluded a 9 year study asking the following question: when students spend four years attending a university (Rice), do they graduate being able to write better than they did when they first matriculated. The answer is yes, but not by much.


    2014 update:


    My ongoing research interests focus on testing the prevailing theory of visual perception and attention today, Anne Treisman's Feature Integration Theory. That theory explains vision in terms of a two-stage process. In the first stage, basic features are extracted by the visual system quickly, automatically, and in parallel; these features include color, depth, orientation, motion, and about a dozen others. In the second stage, features combinations are integrated in a slow, attention demanding, and sequential process. The primary diagnostic tool to identify what features are basic is pop out, a phenomenon in which perceivers can identify the one unique target in a field of identical distractors irrespective of how many distractors there are. Thus a single black sheep pops out from a flock of white; a moving image pops out from a field of stationary.


    Our lab's research challenges this notion by demonstrating several powerful visual phenomena that cannot be explained by Feature Integration Theory. In the last three years, we have focused on cases where integrations of basic feature (e.g., a moving red object - defined by both its color and motion) pop out more quickly than single basic features. We have also discovered and partly explained a new phenomenon we call False Popout. Here, one looks at a display containing all identical items except for one odd one and is instructed to point to that odd one. In one case, subjects repeated point at one of the identical items, which is analogous to pointing to one of the white sheep instead of the lone black sheep. In our most recently discovered effect, observers point neither to the single different item in the display nor to one of the distractors but instead to a point in empty space between them. These effects are quite robust and are shown by almost all people who participate in the experiments. These effect are explained by our Theory of Basic Gestalts, which is described below.


     


     


    2013 statement:


    My current research interests involve the development of the next version of the Theory of Basic Gestalts (Pomerantz, 2001; Pomerantz & Portillo, 2011).  This is a new approach to describing and understanding the Gestalt problem in perception and cognition, whereby when parts or other elements assemble into configurations, those configurations are different from the sum of their parts and are often more perceptually salient, and are perceived more quickly and accurately, than those parts.  TBG attempts to explains these configural effects by means of emergent features that arise when parts configure, such as symmetry, parallelism, colinearity, proximity, orientation, and closure.  TBG maintains that when two or more parts form a perceptual group, that means only that new emergent features have appeared to which the visual system is highly sensitive.  TBG explains a variety of Gesalt phenomena, including configural superiority effects, Garner interference, absence of Stroop interference, successful divided attention, redundancy losses in perception, and false popout.


    The new version of TBG in the works, 2.0, expands the scope of the first version by offering a new explanation of standard popout, wherein a unique item pops out from a field of distractor quickly, with a time that is independent of the number of distractors presented in the display. We now have multiple examples where a single, unique item fails to pop out, and where a common item does pop out. TBG2.0 argues that pop out results from symmetry breaking and not from uniqueness. TBG2.0 also does a better job of explaining false pop, including our lab's new demonstration of pure false pop out.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M. C. (2011). Grouping and emergent features in vision: Toward
    a theory of basic Gestalts. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and
    Performance, 37 (5), 1331-1349.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. (2012).  Emergent Features, Gestalts, and Feature Integration Theory. J. Wolfe & L. Robertson (Eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman (pp. 187-192).  New York: Oxford University Press.


    Wagemans, J., Feldman, J., Gepshtein, S., Kimchi, R. Pomerantz, J. R., van der Helm, P. & van Leeuwen (2012). A century of Gestalt psychology in visual perception II: Conceptual and theoretical foundations. Psychological Bulletin, 138 (6), 1218-1252.


    Pomerantz, J. R. & Cragin, A. I. (2013).  Emergent Features and Feature Combination.  Chapter to appear in Wagemans, J., Oxford Handbook of Perceptual Organization.  Oxford University Press (refereed; paper publication expected 2014). http://goo.gl/LLXoI


    Historically, my research has focused on 4 different areas: · Perceptual Organization and Gestalt Psychology · Selective Attention and Information Processing · Visual Illusions · Mental Imagery My work on the first two of these areas, Perceptual Organization and Selective Attention, represents my primary research focus, even through today, and these two areas are linked. Most centrally, I have studied the age-old problem of visual grouping: the binding in the visual system of sets of features, attributes, contours and the like into unitary perceptual groups. I have worked to develop objective, theoretically-grounded performance measures for grouping, the absence of which proved a major stumbling block for Gestalt psychology. As a result, previously ambiguous terms such as pattern, configuration, and whole can now be operationally defined. My contribution has been to link grouping with selective attention: two entities belong to the same perceptual group if one cannot attended selectively to one while ignoring the other, and if one can successfully attend to both simultaneously. Based on this insight, I was able to demonstrate how perceptual groups are processed, particularly in the human visual system. My work has also led to a better understanding of emergent features, such as symmetry or closure, which can arise from configurations of perceptual elements such as line segments. Here again my work has focused on constructing theoretical conceptions of what constitutes an emergent feature and from the results devising operational definitions and performance measures, mostly RT (reaction time) for detecting them. My demonstrations have found their way into the major textbooks in the field. The RT effects I uncovered are robust, on the order of 10 times the magnitude of the most commonly researched effects in human perception (and may be the largest RT effects in cognitive psychology, so large, as they say, that no statistics are needed to document them). My most recent work is focused on comparing the two most common measures of selective attention, Stroop Interference and Garner Interference. This work shows that despite the nominal similarity of these two measures, the correlation between them is effectively zero. This in turn has led me to scrutinize the theory behind each effect and to the development of a model showing how the two arise independently.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Garner, W. R. (1973b). Stimulus configuration in selective attention tasks. Perception & Psychophysics, 14, 565-569.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Schwaitzberg, S. D. (1975). Grouping by proximity: Selective attention measures. Perception & Psychophysics, 18, 355-361.


    Pomerantz, J. R., Sager, L. C., & Stoever, R. J. (1977). Perception of wholes and of their component parts: Some configural superiority effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 3, 422-435.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983b). Global and local precedence: Selective attention in form and motion perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 112, 516-540.


    Pomerantz, J. R., & Pristach, E. A. (1989). Emergent features, attention and perceptual glue. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 15, 635-649.


    Lew, H., Chmiel, R., Jerger, J., Pomerantz, J. R., & Jerger, S. (1997). Electrophysiologic indices of Stroop and Garner interference reveal linguistic influences on auditory and visual processing. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 8, 104-118.


    My work on illusions includes the first published paper on the Illusory Pausing effect (whereby discs moving on collision courses in the visual field appear to pause when they glide over one another); a complete explanation of the Rubber Pencil Illusion (a robust effect whereby straight line contours appear to bend or go rubbery when the lines are put into motion, as when a pencil is wobbled between finger and thumb); and an explanation of the Grass Is Greener Illusion (which demonstrates rather than being a metaphor, the effect is literally true and is an unavoidable consequence of ecological optics). It also includes work on the Aperture problem in vision (why barber pole stripes appear to move vertically when in fact the pole is rotating horizontally); Motion Aftereffects (when stationary objects appear to move after a viewer has watched a moving display for a prolonged period of time); Apparent Motion (of the type seen in moving pictures, where sequential presentation of static images yields the perception of smooth, continuous motion); and Subjective Contours (the perception of edges where none exist).


    Kolers, P. A., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1971). Figural change in apparent motion. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 87, 99-108.


    Pomerantz, J. R., Goldberg, D. M., Golder, P. S., & Tetewsky, S. (1981). Subjective contours can facilitate performance in a reaction-time task. Perception & Psychophysics, 29, 605-611.


    Goldberg, D. M., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1982). Models of illusory pausing and sticking. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 8, 547-561.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983a). The rubber pencil illusion. Perception & Psychophysics, 33, 365-368.


    Pomerantz, J. R. (1983c). The grass is always greener: An ecological analysis of an old aphorism. Perception, 12, 501-502.


    Finally, my work in Mental Imagery consists of a paper that has gone on to become a Citation Classic and has been reprinted in various places. It deals with one of the core problems in cognitive science, the issue of the form of mental representation, or in particular how the mind and brain encode visual objects. Although I have not continued research in this area, I retain an active interest in it.


    Kosslyn, S. M., & Pomerantz, J. R. (1977). Imagery, propositions, and the form of internal representation. Cognitive Psychology, 9, 52-76. Also reprinted in N. Block (Ed.), Readings in Philosophy of Psychology, Vol. 2. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1981.

     
    Teaching Areas
     Perception and cognition; Cognitive neuroscience; Attention and object perception; General psychology; Vision science
     
    Selected Publications
     Refereed articles
     

    Oppenheimer, D., Zaromb, F., Pomerantz, J. R., Williams, J. C., & Park, Y. S. (2017) Improvement of writing skills during college: A multi-year cross-sectional and longitudinal study of undergraduate writing performance. Assessing Writing, 32, 12-27. Published online December 2016.


    https://www.dropbox.com/s/9ukm1rlrjaslapp/Writing%20Study%20Rice%202017%20final.pdf?dl=0
     
     

    Orsten-Hooge, K. D., Portillo, M.C., and Pomerantz, J. R. (2015). False Pop Out. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 41, 6, 1623-1633. 

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. (2014). The Experience Error and the Pitfalls of Psychopsychology. WIREs Cognitive Science. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1302


    10.1002/wcs.1302
     
     

    Eidels, A., Townsend, J.T., & Pomerantz, J. R. "Where Similarity Beats Redundancy: The Importance of Context, Higher-Order Similarity, and Response Assignment." Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 34 (6) (2008/December) : 1441-1463.

     
     Articles
     

    Wagemans, J., Feldman, J., Gepshtein, S., Kimchi, R. Pomerantz, J. R., van der Helm, P. & van Leeuwen (2012). A century of Gestalt psychology in visual perception II: Conceptual and theoretical foundations. Psychological Bulletin, 138 (6), 1218-1252.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M. C. (2011).  Grouping and emergent features in vision: Toward a theory of basic Gestalts. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37 (5), 1331-1349.



     
     

    Wagemans, J., Feldman, J., Gepshtein, S., Kimchi, R. Pomerantz, J. R., van der Helm, P. & van Leeuwen, A century of Gestalt psychology in visual perception II: Conceptual and theoretical foundations.  Revise and resubmit, Psychological Bulletin.

     
     In press, Visual Cognition
     
     

    Jewell, Stephen W. and Pomerantz, James R "Perceptual organization Organization in Random Dot Patterns: Area Salient and Memorable, Proximity Salient but Forgotten." Submitted

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. "Wholes, holes, and basic features in vision.." Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 7 (2003) : 471-473.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R., Agrawal, A., Jewell, S. W., Jeong, M., Khan, H., and Lozano, S. C. "Contour grouping inside and outside of facial contexts." Acta Psychologica, 114 (2003) : 245-271.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. ""Perception"." Encyclopedia of Cognitive ScienceIn Press

     
     

    Pomerantz, J., Agrawal, Alpna, Stephen W. Jewell ""Contour grouping inside and outside of facial contexts"." Acta PsychologicaSubmitted

     
     Editor of books
     

    In Gernsbacher, M. A. & Pomerantz, J. R. (Eds,) (2015), Psychology and the real world: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society, 2nd edition. New York: Worth Publishers.

     
     

    Gernsbacher, M. A. & Pomerantz, J. R. "Psychology and the real world, Second edition: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society. ." Psychology and the real world, Second edition: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society.

     
     

    Gernsbacher, M.A., Pew, R.W., Hough, L., & Pomerantz, J.R. (2011). Psychology and the real world: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society. New York: Worth Publishers.

    Foreword by Malcolm Gladwell.  All proceeds go to the FABBS Foundation

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. (Ed.) "Topics in Integrative Neuroscience: From Cells to Cognition."  (2008)

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Crair, M. (Eds.) "Integrative Neuroscience: from Molecules to Cognition." In Revision

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. ""Integrative Neuroscience: from Molecules to Cognition," J. R. Pomerantz & M. Crair, Eds.." Submitted

     
     Book chapters
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Cragin, A. I. (2015). Emergent Features and Feature Combination. In Wagemans, J. (Ed.), Oxford Handbook of Perceptual Organization. Oxford University Press. 


    http://goo.gl/LLXoI
     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Gernsbacher, M. A. (2015). Psychology and the real world: An introduction. In Gernsbacher, M. A. & Pomerantz, J. R. (Eds,), Psychology and the real world: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society, 2nd edition. New York: Worth Publishers.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Gernsbacher, M. A. "Psychology and the real world: An introduction. ." Psychology and the real world, Second edition: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society. : 1-8.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Cragin, A. I.  Emergent Features and Feature Combination.  Chapter in Wagemans, J., Oxford Handbook of Perceptual Organization.  Oxford University Press 2013 (print version 2014).

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. (2012).  Emergent Features, Gestalts, and Feature Integration Theory. J. Wolfe & L. Robertson (Eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman (pp. 187-192).  New York: Oxford University Press.

    Note: This is a Festschrift volume for Anne Treisman.  She will be receiving the National Medal of Science from President Obama in 2013

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. Emergent Features and Feature Integration Theory. Chapter to appear in J. Wolfe & L. Robertson, Eds., Festschrift for Anne Treisman.  Oxford University Press, 2012

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. Perceptual Organization: Vision. Chapter in B. Goldstein (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Perception. Sage Publications.

     
     Chapter in Peterson, M. A., Gillam, B., Sedgwick, H. A. (expected publication date: 2006). In the Mind's Eye: Julian Hochberg on the Perception of Pictures, Film, and the World. NY: Oxford University Press
     
     Pomerantz, J. R. (2007) Piecemeal Perception and Hochbergs Window: Grouping of Stimulus Elements over Distances. Chapter in Peterson, M. A., Gillam, B., Sedgwick, H. A. (2007). In the Mind's Eye: Julian Hochberg's Contributions to Our Understanding of the Perception of Pictures, Film, and the World. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
     

    Pomerantz, James R. "Piecemeal Perception and Hochberg's Window: Grouping of Stimulus Elements over Distances. Chapter in Peterson, M., Gillam, B., and Sedgwick, H. A. (Eds.). In the Mind's Eye: Julian Hochberg on the Perception of Pictures, Film, and the World.."  (2005) In Press

     
     Conference papers
     Eidels, A., & Townsend, J. T., & Pomerantz, J. R. (2005). Systems Factorial Technology Analysis of Pomerantz¿s Configural Figures. In J. S. Monahan, S. M. Sheffert, & J. T. Townsend (Eds.). Fechner Day 2005 (pp. 89-92). Mt. Pleasant, MI. Annual meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics
     
     Other
     

    James R. Pomerantz "Perception: An Overview." Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, Nature Publishing Group (2002)

     
     

    James R. Pomerantz, Alpna Agrawal, Sandra Lozano, and Stephen Jewell "Selective Attention and Contour Grouping inside Facial Context." Acta Psychologica

     
     

    James R. Pomerantz "Recent Developments in Neuroscience at Rice." University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, Neuroscience Research Center Newsletter (2001)

     
    Creative Works
     Exhibitions - Solo - Floral Landscapes
     Book of floral macrophotography accepted into the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Located in the Hirsch Library, James R. Pomerantz, Houston, TX (2008-2013)
     
    Presentations
     Conference Committee Member
     21. Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M.C. The Perception of Four-Dot Configurations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwest Cognition Conference (Armadillo), Trinity University, San Antonio TX (October 12-13, 2007)
     
     

    "Basic Gestalts: The Four Most Fundamental Emergent Features in Vision.." Southwest Cognition Conference, Texas Tech University. (October 20-21, 2006) With Pomerantz, J. R. & Portillo, M. C.

     
     

    "Studying Configural Processing and Gestalts: What are the Basic Challenges?." Configural Processing Consortium, Rice University, Houston, TX. (November 15, 2006) With Pomerantz, J. R.

     
     

    "Visual Gestalts: Search Asymmetries with Emergent Features.." Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Houston, TX. (November 16 - 19, 2006) With Portillo, M. C. & Pomerantz, J. R.

     
     Conference Paper
     
    1. Pomerantz, J. R. (2016). Varieties of part-whole relationships and the Theory of Basic Gestalts. Talk given at the International Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Granada, Spain May 5-8, 2016
     
     
    1. Pomerantz, J.R. Part-Whole Relationships and the Theory of Basic Gestalts. 10thth annual meeting of the Configural Processing Consortium, Chicago, Illinois, Nov. 18, 2015.
     
     Invited Papers
     
    1. Orsten, K.D. & Pomerantz, J.R.  Pure False Pop Out.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, Brown University, Providence, RI, March 29, 2013.
     
     19. Portillo, M. C. & Pomerantz, J. R. Visual Gestalts: Search Asymmetries with Emergent Features. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, University of Connecticut, Storrs (March 8-11, 2007)
     
     Invited Talks
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. (2011).  The Basics of a Theory of Basic Gestalts.  Paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, University of Washington, Seattle WA, April 15, 2011.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R.  Failures of the Mind and Brain: Perceptual Illusions and What They Tell Us about Cognition.  Invited lead-off colloquium, Scientia Institute, Rice University, September 7, 2010.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. Grouping and Emergent Features in Vision: An Approach to Basic Gestalts.  Invited colloquium, Washington University, February 24, 2010.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R.  The Experience Error and the Pitfalls of Psychopsychology. Invited colloquium, Washington University, February 25, 2010.

     
     23. Pomerantz, J. R. Scholarship and Professional Evaluation: An Administrative Perspective. Panelist presentation at the 7th Annual Meeting of Women in Cognitive Science, Long Beach, CA, November 15, 2007
     
     Pomerantz, J. R. The Experience Error Revisited. Paper presented at the 2nd Annual Meeting of the Configural Processing Consortium (CPC 2007), Long Beach, CA, November 14, 2007
     
     

    "The Perception of Four-Dot Configurations." 48th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, California. (November 15-18, 2007) With 24. Portillo, M. C., Hammarsten, C. Keshvari, S., Jewell, S. W., & Pomerantz, J. R.

     
     

    "Foundations of Grouping in Vision: Basic Features, Emergent Feature, and Gestalts." University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas. (October 7, 2005)

     
     

    "Configurality." International Society for Psychophysics, Coimbra, Portugal. (October 18 - 22, 2004) With James Townsend, Indiana University

     
     

    "Perceptual Grouping and Visual Search." International Symposium on Visual Search, Munich, Germany. (June 5 ¿ 10, 2003)

     
     

    "Seeing Red and Green: Bringing Color Vision to Life.." "Bringing Science to Life: A Conversation with Oliver Sacks and Others¿, University of Houston. (October 1, 2003)

     
     

    "Contour grouping and the Search for Emergent Features." Society of Experimental Psychologists, U. California at Berkeley. (April 6, 2002)

     
     

    "Perceptual Grouping and Visual Search." International Symposium on Visual Search, Munich, Germany. (June 5 - 10, 2003)

     
     Keynote Speaker
     
    1. Pomerantz, J.R. Theory of Basic Gestalts, Version 2.0 . Keynote address delivered at the 8th annual meeting of the Configural Processing Consortium, Toronto, November 13, 2013.
     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R.  The Perception of Visual Configurations and their Parts: A Theory of Basic Gestalts.  The 19th Kanizsa lecture, University of Trieste, Museo Revoltella, Trieste, Italy, Nov. 24, 2011(http://www.psico.units.it/convegni/kanlect/index.php3)

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. 2010.  The Theory of Basic Gestalts and the Measurement of Perceptual Organization.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwest Cognition Conference (Armadillo), Friday, October 24, 2010, Texas A&M University.

     
     Lectures
     
    1. Pomerantz, J.R. Pop Out and Symmetry Breaking in 3D Space.  Talk presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Toronto, November 15, 2013.
     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. & Orsten, K., False Pop Out, Symmetry Breaking, and the Theory of Basic Gestalts.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, Houston, TX, April 14, 2012

     
     

    Orsten, K., Hahn, A, and Pomerantz, J. R.  Pattern-breaking pop out: Further evidence in support of the Theory of Basic Gestalts.  Poster presented at the annual meeting of Object Perception, Attention, & Memory (OPAM), Minneapolis, MN, November 2012

     
     

    Orsten, K. & Pomerantz, J. R.   Pop out, true and false. Talk presented at the 7th annual meeting of the Configural Processing Consortium, Minneapolis, MN, November 2012

     
     

    Cragin, A., Sparck, E. & Pomerantz, J. R. (2011, presenting author Pomerantz).  Indicating Direction Efficiently: A Few Pointers.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Seattle WA, November 4, 2011.

     
     

    Stupina, A. & Pomerantz, J. R. Perceptual organization and gestalt formation: Emergent features in two-line stimuli.  Poster presented at the annual meeting of Object Perception and Attention.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R., Keshvari, S., Portillo, M. C., Stupina, A. I., &  Sokunbi, D.  New configural superiority effects in the temporal and spatial domains.  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, St. Louis, Missouri, November 21, 2010.

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R. Organization in Perception and in Memory.  Paper presented at the 5th annual meeting of the Configural Processing Consortium.  Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, November 17, 2010

     
     

    Stupina, A. I. & Pomerantz, J. R. Perceptual Organization based on Gestalts: Emergent Features in Two-Line Space.  Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Science Society, May 10 2010.  Abstract: J Vis August 2, 2010 10(7): 1198; doi:10.1167/10.7.1198

     
     

    "Pomerantz, J. R. The Experience Error Revisited. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwest Cognition Conference, University of Texas at El Paso (October 24-25, 2008)." Southwest Cognition Conference, UTEP. (October, 2008)

     
     

    "Portillo, M. C. & Pomerantz, J. R. Evaluating Emergent Features and Topological Properties with Multiple Tools. Paper presented at the 48\9th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Chicago, IL (November 13 – 16, 2008).." Psychonomic Society, Chicago, IL. (Nov., 2008) With Portillo, M. C.

     
     

    "Systems Factorial Technology Analysis of Pomerantz's Configural Figures: Where topology beats redundancy. ." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, University of California, San Diego. (March 23-24, 2006) With Eidels, A., Townsend, J. T., & Pomerantz, J. R.

     
     

    "Varieties of Emergent Features in Visual Perceptual Organization." Psychonomic Society Annual Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (November 12, 2005) With Mary C. Portillo

     
     

    "False Pop Out." Psychonomic Society annual meeting, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (November 21, 2004) With Mary c. Portillo

     
     

    "Pop Out: True and False." Society of Experimental Psychologists, Washington University, St. Louis. (March 7 - 8, 2003)

     
     

    "The Genesis of Perceptual Organization: Basic Emergent Features in Vision." Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Vancouver, British Columbia. (November 6 - 9, 2003) With Portillo, M. C., Jewell, S.W. & Agrawal, A.

     
     

    "Several Strange Effects Arising from Perceptual Grouping in Vision." Psychonomic Society, Kansas City, Missouri. (November 21 - 23, 2002)

     
     Other
     

    "Advice to Faculty on Dealing with the University Administration." Southwestern Conference on Teaching Psychology, Houston, TX. (November 10, 2001)

     
     

    "An Overview of Perceptual Organization: Principles, Methods, Findings, and Theory." Bolzano International School in Cognitive Analysis, Bolzano, Italy. (September 10 - 14, 2001)

     
     

    "Elementary Levels of Perceptual Organization in Vision." Texas Area Cognition Conference (Armadillo), SMU, Dallas TX. (October 19, 2001)

     
     

    "Garner Interference as a Diagnostic for Low-Level Visual Grouping and Emergent Features." Object Perception and Memory (OPAM 2001), Orlando, Florida. (November 15, 2001)

     
     

    "Neuroscience and the Rice - Texas Medical Center Connection." The Discussion Group, Houston, TX. (October 17, 2001)

     
     

    "Object Perception and the Allocation of Attention in Vision." Bolzano, Italy. (September 10 - 14, 2001)

     
     

    "The Cognitive Neuroscience of Perceptual Organization." Bolzano International School in Cognitive Analysis, Bolzano, Italy. (September 10 - 14, 2001)

     
     

    "Using classroom technology in teaching human sensation and perception." Southwestern Conference on Teaching Psychology, Houston,TX. (November 10, 2001)

     
     

    "Visual Primitives and the Search for Emergent Features." Bolzano International School in Cognitive Analysis, Bolzano, Italy`. (September 10 - 14, 2001)

     
     

    "Dealing with the University Administration." Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, Charleston, SC. (February 19, 2000)

     
     

    "How can we know when selective attention fails?." 41st Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, New Orleans, LA. (November 17, 2000)

     
     Posters
     
    1. Mestry, N., Orsten-Hooge, K. D., Pomerantz, J. R., & Donnelly, N. (2016). Eye Movements Reveal the Competition between Basic and Configural Features in False Pop Out in Visual Search. Poster presented at the 16th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, St. Pete Beach, Florida USA, May 17, 2016.
     
     

    Costa, T. L., Orsten-Hooge, K. D., Rêgo, G. G., Pomerantz, J.R., and Boggio, P.S. (2016) Neural correlates of configural superiority and emergent features: An EEG study. Poster presented at the 16th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, St. Pete Beach, Florida USA, May 14, 2016

     
     
    1. Orsten, K.D. and Pomerantz, J.R. Is False Pop Out Really Pop Out? Evidence from RT functions. Poster presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, St. Pete Beach, Florida USA, May 20, 2014
     
     

    Pomerantz, J.R., Qiang, B., Austin, A., and Orsten, K.D. Target Localization Responses Diagnose Emergent Features in Singleton Pop Out. Poster presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, St. Pete Beach, Florida USA, May 20, 2014.

     
     
    1. Cragin, A. I. & Pomerantz, J. R.  Emergent Features Help Resolve Ambiguous Apparent Motion.  Poster presented at the 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, Florida USA, May 13, 2013
     
     
    1. Orsten, K.D. & Pomerantz, J. R.  False Pop Out and "Anti-metamers”.  Poster presented at the 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, Florida USA, May 13, 2013.
     
     

    Cragin, A. I., Ding, B., & Pomerantz, J. R.  Emergent features help resolve ambiguous apparent motion.  Poster presented at the annual meeting of Object Perception, Attention, & Memory (OPAM), Minneapolis, MN, November 2012

     
     

    Orsten, K., Portillo, M. C. & Pomerantz, J. R. (2011, presenting author Orsten).  A Symmetry-Breaking Theory of False Pop Out.   Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Seattle WA, November 4,2011.

     
     

    Cragin, A. I., Hahn, A., and Pomerantz, J. R.  Emergent features predict grouping of line segments.  Poster presented at the annual meeting of Object Perception, Attention, & Memory (OPAM), Seattle WA, November 3, 2011

     
     

    Pomerantz, J. R., Stupina, A. I., and Sparck, E.  (2011). What's the "Point"? Assessing the Effectiveness of Stimuli that Indicate Direction.  Poster presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, Florida, USA, May 6 – 11,2011

     
     Portillo, M.C. & Pomerantz, J. R. Search asymmetries with emergent features. Poster presented at the 7th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2007
     
     

    "Evaluating grouping via emergent features: A systematic approach." Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, Florida. (May 7, 2005) With Mary C. Portillo

     
     

    "Grouping via emergent features: A systematic approach.." Object Perception and Attention, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (November 10, 2005) With Mary C. Portillo

     
     

    "Perceiving area in a set of random dots." Object Perception and Memory conference, Vancouver, British Columbia. (November 6, 2003) With Jewell, S

     
     

    "Contour grouping and the Search for Emergent Features." Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL. (May, 2002) With Apu Agrawal, & Mary C. Portillo

     
    Editorial Positions
     Editor, Psychology and the Real World. Worth. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor, Essays in Cognitive Psychology Series. Psychology Press / Taylor & Francis. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences. National Academy of Sciences. (2010 - 2010)

     Other, MIT Press. MIT Press. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Psychology Press. Psychology Press. (2010 - 2010)

     Other, Perception. Pion. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Psychology Press. Psychology Press. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Journal of Vision. (2012 - 2016)

     Other, Psychological Science. (2012 - 2015)

     Other, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance. (2013 - 2016)

     Other, Perception. (2012 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. American Psychological Association. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, i-Perception. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, Journal of Comparative Psychology. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, Psychological Bulletin. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2015 - 2017)

     Editor at Large, Frontiers in Perception Science. (2016 - 2017)

     Editor at Large, Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. Springer / Psychonomics Society. (2016 - 2017)

     Editor at Large, PeerJ. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, Cognitive Processing. (2016 - 2017)

     Editor at Large, Acta Psychologica. (2015 - 2016)

     Editor at Large, Behavior Research Methods. (2016 - 2017)

     Other, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. (2012 - 2015)

     Other, Attention, Perception & Performance. (2013 - 2013)

     Other, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance. American Psychological Association. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Psychological Science. Association for Psychological Science. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. Springer. (2011 - 2011)

     Other, Journal of Vision. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. (2011 - 2011)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Psychological Science. (2006 - 2006)

     Other, Perception & Psychophysics. Psychonomic Society. (2000 - 2000)

     Member of the Editorial Board, Psychological Science. (2005 - 2005)

     Series Editor, Essays in Cognitive Psychology Series. Psychology Press (Taylor & Francis Group),. (2003 - 2003)

     Ad Hoc Reviewer, Perception & Psychophysics. Psychonomic Society. (2001 - 2001)

     Series Editor, Psychology Press "Essays" Series. Taylor & Francis Group. (2004 - 2004)

     Editor, Essays in Cognitive Psychology Series. Psychology Press / Taylor & Francis. (2007 - 2007)

     Editor, Psychological Science. American Psychological Society. (2004 - 2004)

     Series Editor, Psychology Press, Essays in Cognitive Psychology. (2005 - 2005)

     Series Editor, Psychology Press, Essays in Cognitive Psychology. (2006 - 2006)

    Supervised Theses & Dissertations
     Laura Martin, MA untitled - Laura Martin. (2002) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Aniko Sandor, MA untitled - Aniko Sandor. (2002) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Camille Peres, MA untitled - Camille Peres. (2002) (Thesis Committee Member)

     NOHSOOK PARK, MA SEMANTIC AND PHONOLOGICAL REPRESENTATIONS. (2002) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Mary C. Portillo, MA Emergent features and configural superiority effects. (2002) (Thesis Director)

     Stephen Jewell, MA Perceptual Organization in Random Dot Patterns. (2002) (Thesis Director)

     Steve Jewell, MA Steve Jewell MA. (2003) (Thesis Director)

     Susan Wood, MA Susan Wood MA. (2003) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Delia Kothman, MA Delia Kothman MA. (2003) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Laura Martin, MA Laura Martin MA. (2003) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Aniko Sandor, MA Aniko Sandor MA. (2003) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Camille Peres, MA Camille Peres MA. (2003) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Camille Peres, MA Dimensions of Sound in Auditory Displays: The Effects of Redundant Dimensions. (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Mary Portillo, MA Basic Emergent Features in Vision. (2004) (Thesis Director)

     Mary Portillo, MA Mary Portillo MA. (2004) (Thesis Director)

     Delia Kothman, MA Exploring Separable Executive Functions in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder using Event Related Potentials. (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Erik Chang, PhD The Cortical Mechanisms of Visual Stability. (2004) (Thesis Director)

     Aniko Sandor, MA Perceptual interactions of duration with pitch.... (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Laura Martin, MA Individual differences in decision-making and reward processing. (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Susan Wood, MA Disruption of Executive Attention in Schizophrenia. (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Chris Fick, PhD Attention Capture by Visual Onsets. (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Michael Fleetwood, PhD untitled. (2004) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Laura Martin, PhD Impulsivity and rewards: An investigation of the neural substrates of reward processing in impulsivity. (2005) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Chris Fick, PhD Inattentional Blindness: Observing Unexpected Objects in a Dynamic Visual Task. (2005) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Delia Kothmann, PhD Exploring Executive Functions in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity. (2005) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Kelly Biegler, PhD To be named. (2005) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Michael Fleetwood, PhD Refining Theoretical Models of Visual Sampling in Supervisory Control Tasks. (2005) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Aniko Sandor, MA Running Head: Interaction of Duration with Pitch and Rate of Change in Pitch. (2005) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Stephen Jewell, PhD Visual Perception of Shape and Area of Unclosed Forms. (2005) (Thesis Director)

     Mary C. Portillo, MA Emergent Features in Human Vision: Looking at CSEs with the Odd-Quadrant Task. (2005) (Thesis Director)

     Mary C. Portillo, PhD Emergent Features in Human Vision: Looking at CSEs with the Odd-Quadrant Task. (2006) (Thesis Director)

     Laura Martin, PhD Impulsivity and Neural Systems of Rewards. (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Chris Fick, PhD Inattentional Blindness: Observing Unexpected Objects in a Dynamic Visual Task. (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Delia Kothmann, PhD Exploring Executive Functions in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity. (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Stephen W. Jewell, PhD Visual perception of shape and area. (2006) (Thesis Director)

     Jennifer Boyer, Ma Jennifer Boyer's Masters Thesis (title unknown). (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Melanie Hamel, PhD Melanie Hamel's PhD thesis (to be named). (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Elizabeth Miller, PhD (in Political Science) Elizabeth Miller's PhD thesis (title unknown). (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Aniko Sandor, PhD The Range Effect: Duration Estimates Increase with More Pitch Change. (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Kelly Biegler, PhD COMPETITION AND INHIBITION IN LEXICAL RETRIEVAL: ARE COMMON MECHANISMS USED IN LANGUAGE AND MEMORY TASKS?. (2006) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Chris Fick, PhD Noticing of unexpected objects in a dynamic task environment. (2007) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Chen Sun, MA Motion Asymmetry Theory: A Unifying Account of Motion/Position Illusions?. (2007) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Jennifer Boyer, MA The Priming Effects of Task Irrelevant Information. (2007) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Anikó Sándor, PhD The Range Effect: Duration Estimates Increase with Pitch Change. (2007) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Stephen W. Jewell, PhD Visual perception of shape and area. (2007) (Thesis Director)

     Ruth M. Johnson, PhD Visual Influences on Electrotactile Processing. (2007) (Thesis Co-Director)

     Chen Sun, MA Motion Asymmetry Theory: A Unifying Account of Motion/Position Illusions?. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Melanie Hamel, PhD tbn. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Jennifer Boyer, PhD Top-down Influences on Crowding. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Jennifer Boyer, MA The Priming Effects of Task Irrelevant Information. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Ruth M. Johnson, PhD Visual Influences on Electrotactile Processing. (2008) (Thesis Co-Director)

     Clayton Stanley, Masters Thesis. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Mary C. Portillo, PhD Grouping and Search Efficiency in Emergent Features and Topological Properties. (2008) (Thesis Director)

     Melanie Hamel, PhD tbn. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Mary C. Portillo, PhD Grouping and Search Efficiency in Emergent Features and Topological Properties. (2008) (Thesis Director)

     Jennifer Boyer, PhD Top-down Influences on Crowding. (2008) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Portillo Mary C., PhD Mary Portillo's PhD dissertation - completed Fall 2009. (2009) (Thesis Director)

     Anna I Stupina, MA Anna Stupina's Master's Thesis committee chair. (2010) (Thesis Director)

     Jennifer Chen, MA Jennifer Chen MA thesis committee. (2010) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Anna I. Cragin, PhD Perceptual Organization in Vision: Emergent Features in Two-Line Space. (2011) (Thesis Director)

     Jennifer Chen, PhD Jennifer Chen PhD thesis committee. (2012) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Jennifer Chen, PhD Human Olfactory Perception: Characteristics, Mechanisms, and Functions. (2013) (Thesis Co-Director)

     Anna I Cragin, PhD Relative Salience of Emergent Features in Vision. (2013) (Thesis Director)

     Melissa A. Gallagher, MA Modeling Curved Movement. (2013) (Thesis Committee Member)

     Anna I Cragin, PhD Relative Salience of Emergent Features in Vision. (2013) (Thesis Director)

     Anna Cragin, PhD Relative Salience of Emergent Features in Vision. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Orsten Kimberley, PhD False Pop Out. (2014) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberley D. Orsten, PhD False Pop Out. (2015) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberley D. Orsten, PhD False Pop Out. (2015) (Thesis Director)

     Kimberley D. Orsten, PhD False Pop Out. (2016) (Thesis Director)

    Awards, Prizes, & Fellowships
     3rd prize, Best Illusion of the Year Contest 2014, Neural Correlate Society (May 18, 2014)

     Keynote address at annual meeting, Configural Processing Symposium (November 2013)

     19th Annual Kanizsa Lecturer, Univerity of Trieste, Trieste, Italy, (November 24, 2011)

     Delivered the Rock Memorial Lecture in the Department of Psychology, UC Berkeley, Spring 2009, UC Berkeley (Fall 2009)

     Elected President of the Foundation for the Advancement of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Federation of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences (January 2005)

     Brown Teaching Grant, Rice University (April 2004)

     President-elect, Foundation for the Advancement of Behavioral and Brain Sciences (Dec. 2004)

     External Review of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Texas at Dallas, UT Dallas (April, 2002)

     Invitation to lecture at a Kanizsa Conference in Bolzano, Italy, June 2001 (a follow-up to my four lectures delivered there in September, 2001), Bolzano, Italy (June, 2002)

     Elected into Membership of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, Society of Experimental Psychologists (March, 2001)

     External Review of Psychology and Neuroscience at Georgia Tech, Georgia Institute of Technology (January, 2002)

     Visiting Fellowship Program in Functional MRI, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard University (March 1 - 4, 2000)

     Invitation to give series of 4 invited addresses in Bolzano, Italy, Bolzano International School in Cognitive Analysis (September, 2001)

     Invited to write a chapter for the Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, (Nature Publishing Group)

     Testimony before Education Subcommittee, Texas State Legislature (May 4, 2000)

     Outside evaluation for Department of Psychology and Neuroscience program, Florida State University (October, 2000)

     Expert witness, Tulane University (Summer and Fall, 2000)

    Positions Held
     Member, Finance Committee, Psychonomic Society. (2012 - 2012)

     President elect, Fellows Committee, American Psychological Association Division 3 (Experimental Psychology). (2010 - 2010)

     Past President and Board of Directors, FABBS Foundation. (2010 - 2010)

     Board member, Disability 101. (2012 - 2012)

     Board member, FABBS Foundation. (2012 - 2012)

     Founding president and current board member, FABBS Foundation, FABBS Foundation, Washington DC. (2013 - 2014)

     Member, Advisory Board, Women in Cognitive Sciences (WiCS). (2016 - 2017)

     Negotiator, Psychonomic Society. (2014 - 2014)

     Member of the board, FABBS, Federation of Associations of Behavioral & Brain Sciences. (2013 - 2014)

     President, Configural Processing Consortium. (2013 - 2016)

     Member of the Governing Board, Psychonomic Society. (2016 - 2023)

     Member, Engineering and Medicine’s Intelligence Science and Technology Experts Group (ISTEG), National Academies of Sciences. (2016 - 2017)

     Chair, Finance Committee, Psychonomic Society. (2013 - 2014)